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The United Nations Memorial Cemetery »« A Cable Car to Geumjeongsanseong Fortress

Busan Food Journal, Part One

Korean Cookbooks

We ate a lot of interesting new foods during our time in Busan. The city’s supermarkets are rather expensive, and eating out was almost as cheap as cooking at home, particularly when you stick to the kinds of local joints which we prefer. This is the first of our recaps on what we ate, and what it’s called

Most of Busan’s restaurants don’t have menus with pictures or English descriptions, so a lot of our meal choices will be the result of a random guess-and-point, until we learn the basics. To help ourselves, and other newbies to the food culture of Korea, we’ve decided to keep a little journal of the things we’ve consumed. Bon appetit!

Food Journal: Part Two | Part Three | Part Four | Part Five | Part Six

Mulmil-myeon (물밀면)
Mul-mil-myeon

Not sure if I’m transliterating that correctly, but mulmil-myeon is cold noodle soup. Thick noodles served in spicy cold broth, and perfect for a hot summer day… except, we had it on an unseasonably cool spring day. Brrrr. Juergen got the dry mixed noodles (비빔면), which were also cold, and we split dumplings. It was all good; the restaurant was called Bonga Milmyeon in the Suyeong District(location). [More Pics]

Dongnae Pajeon (파전)
Dongnae-Pajeon

“Jeon” means something like “pancake”, and this popular Korean dish can be made with a variety of main ingredients. When made with green onions, the name of the dish becomes “pa”-jeon. Pajeon is a specialty of Dongnae, the neighborhood we were in after having hiked around the Geumjeongsanseong Fortress, and we ordered some at a street vendor (approx. location). Our pancakes made with eggs, flour, chunks of pork and bunch of green onions. Yum (I’ve been practicing, and can now write “yum” in Korean: 염) [More Pics]

Pho Bo (쇠고기 깔국수)
Pho Bo

We tried this Vietnamese dish at a cute restaurant called Saigon, near our home at the Gwangalli Beach (location). I’m not sure what makes this a Vietnamese dish… maybe the type of noodles? But it was good. We also had spring rolls here. [More Pics]

Dolsot Bibimbap (돌솥 비빔밥)
Dolsot-Bibimbap

Bibimbap is both the cutest word you’re going to see today, and a delicious meal which literally means “mixed rice”. It’s one of Korea’s signature dishes, and can be served up in an infinite number of variations. At the rather pricey Well-Being Rice Cafe in Seumyong (location), I ordered Spicy Octopus Dolsot Bibimbap, while Jürgen went for Mushroom & Bulgogi. Dolsot bibimbaps are served in a piping hot stone bowl coated with oil. Once served, you have to immediately stir the rice around, so that it doesn’t burn to the bowl. [More Pics]

Kalguksu (칼국수)
Kalguksu

We had this soup full of thick, wheat noodles at a small restaurant in Dongnae (approx. location). The name Kalguksu literally translates to “knife noodles”, referring to the fact that the noodles are hand-cut into shape. This hot and filling soup is, strangely, a summer dish in Korea. The waitress also gave us black bean noodles for free (“service”, as they say here). We weren’t about to protest! [More Pics]

Tonkatsu (돈까스)
Deep-Fried-Pork-Cutlet

On the 9th floor of Shinsegae Centum City (location), there are a number of restaurants which look uniformly excellent. Before watching The Avengers in the world’s biggest 4D screen, we got dinner at Mita’s Kitchen. These delicious pork cutlets were soaked in sweet and sour sauce, and served with the usual line-up of delicious side items. [More Pics]

More Pics from Bonga Milmyeon
Korean-Noodles-Gwangalli-Beach
Busy Noodle Place
/Scissor-Noodles
Mixed Noodles
Noodle Menue
More Pics of Pajeon
Pancakes-Busan
Bacon Pancakes
More Pics from Saigon
Gwangalli-Saigon
Saigon Menu
Saigon Rolls
Another Pic from Well-Being Rice Cafe
Mushroom-Bibimbap
More Pics of Kalguksu
Kalgugksu-Korea
Noodles-in-Black-Bean
We also ate Jajangmyeon, a black-bean noodle dish
Another Pic from Mita’s Cafe
Pork Korea

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May 11, 2012 at 12:50 pm
9 comments »
  • May 12, 2012 at 6:05 am123

    Hi, I see that you have the picture for Jjajangmyeon in place of Kalguksu (under “More Pics of Kalguksu”), you need to fix that!I lived in that city for ten years. I miss that place. Good luck with your blog!

  • May 12, 2012 at 6:03 pmjjdaddyo

    This is the tastiest post you’ve had in a while, although you are brave to point to the menu and pray.One thing I always wonder about is the relative cost of things in the places you go, since you say food is “expensive”. Obviously, I know the prices of things in Savannah, but I have no idea about food, internet access, train tickets and 1 bedroom apartments in all the other places you’ve been. It would be interesting to see some kind of comparison.

  • June 19, 2012 at 8:22 ambbungtigi

    pho is a vietnamese dish… ;)

    • June 19, 2012 at 8:24 amJuergen

      Yes, there are Vietnamese restaurants in Korea!

  • July 23, 2012 at 3:09 pmchris and becky

    great blog guys. This was just what we were looking for as we are foodies and we are planning a southeast asia tour which includes a week long stop in Korea.


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