Busan Map
Site Index
Contact
Random
Our Travel Books
Advertising / Press

Final Set of Random Busan Pictures

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Order Kimchi Online

Candy Land Busan

We published over 2000 photos during our three months in Busan. That’s a record for our site, and a testament to what an amazing city this is. As you’ll see in our final batch of photos, Busan is strangely compelling and offers a little bit of everything, from the beautiful to the amusing, to the downright bizarre. Taking pictures here was always a blast… we’re going to miss it.

-Please Like Us On Facebook

Random Couple in Love
Sneaky Sude
Busan-Gwangan-Bridge
Centum City
Lotte Busan
Moving TO Korea
Samick-Beach
Sneaky Camp
Spin Disk Korea
S-Oil
Win Ice Cream
Tourists Getting Lost
Soju Fest
OMG-Foreigners
Going Home
Green Moped
Graffiti Pose
Street Art Busan
Spray Can Graffiti
Summer Day Busan
Street-Photography-Busan
Taxi Art
Busan Episodes
Busan Ferry
Big Ship Busan
Busan Jeep Tour
Busan Seats
Korean Sneakers
makgeolli-Can
Cleaning in Busan
Korean Beauty
Drawing Anime Busan
Korean Love
Korean Barbor Shop
Lamp Shop Korea
Soju Hof Korea
Rio in Korea
Steel Mushrooms
Water Park Busan
Weird Housing in Busan
Bexco Busan
Traffic in Busan
Famous-Hair-STylist-in-Korea
Busan
Korean Ice Cream
BlackOut Korea
Busan Grill
Cutting Pork Busan
Street-Grill
Busan Restaurants
FAke Food
Korea Ho Bar
Tips For Tits
7-Eleven-in-Korea
Rent-Apartment-in-Busan
Busan At Night
Almost Free Candy

, , , , , , , ,
July 30, 2012 at 5:03 am Comments (2)

Munhyeon-Dong Inner Town

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Learn Korean

Every once in awhile, we’ll choose a city excursion that’s a little off-the-wall, like an unknown neighborhood that doesn’t ever see tourists, picked almost at random. Often, these end up being among our favorite spots: Barracas in Buenos Aires comes to mind, as does Pampahasi in Bolivia. Other times… well other times, we end up in a place like Munhyeon-dong.

Munjeon-Dong-Busan

We had read about a project in Munhyeon-dong Inner Town which sought to redefine one of Busan’s most economically depressed areas using the transformative power of art. 47 murals were painted on the neighborhood’s houses, supposedly rejuvenating the area. The project won the Korean Public Design Grand Prize in 2008 and sounded similar to the open air art project in Gamcheon, which we really liked. Plus, it was in an area of the city which we hadn’t yet seen. Gotta be a winner!

Getting off the bus in Munhyeon, we started asking around how to get to the Inner Town project, receiving nothing but bewildered glares in response. We showed some pictures of the art we’d pulled off the internet, but nobody could help us. A feeling of defeat started to sink in; when residents don’t even recognize the art their neighborhood is supposedly famed for, it can’t be good.

We persevered and eventually found a woman who recognized one of the murals, and pointed up an insanely steep hill. This was during the midst of the summer monsoon season and though the rain had paused, the sun was strong and humidity nearly unbearable. By the time we reached the Inner Town, we were soaked in sweat. We realized almost immediately that this had been a wasted of effort. Munhyeon-dong is little more than a ghetto of cheap housing and their “art project” looked as though a group of moderately talented twelve-year-old kids had finally gotten their parents’ permission to draw on the sides of buildings.

Still, it wasn’t entirely a wash. The art wasn’t any good, but from up high there was a great view over the city. We could see Busan Port, the tower in Democracy Park and the Diamond Bridge. Even so, Munhyeon-dong Inner Town isn’t one of the essential experiences in Busan.

Location on our Busan Map
-Great Hotels in Busan

Low Class Korea
Munjeon-Dong-Art-Village
Inner Village
Busan-Cityscape
Metropolis-Korea
Busan Ghetto
Cat Painting
Graffiti-Korea
Korean Bubble Gum
Korean Street Art
Silent Art
Rain Drop Art
Soju Fest
Bird-House-Korea
Buddhas-Face

, , , , , ,
July 25, 2012 at 5:15 am Comments (3)

The Busan Museum

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Korean History Books

Opened in 1978 at the western end of the U.N. Park in Daeyeon, the Busan Museum takes visitors on a journey through the history of the city and its region, from paleolithic times to the modern day. We visited recently and found it to be the perfect rainy-day activity.

Face-Shell-Korea-Busan

Busan Museum is quite large, well-organized and, like most museums in the city, completely free. Busan as a city has a relatively recent story; up until the late 19th century, it was a mere fishing village, nowhere near as important as nearby Gyeongju or Daegu. Not until 1876, when its port was opened to international trade, did Busan become a city of any importance.

But that doesn’t mean that its history isn’t interesting. Starting in the late Paleolithic period, with the first documented appearance of humanity around the mouth of the Nakdong, visitors are slowly brought to the modern age. There are two floors of fascinating exhibits which have excellent English translations and shed a light on life in the various phases of Korean history.

Byeonhan-Skull-Crushing

Our favorite section detailed the period of the Three Kingdoms (around 57 AD – 668), when the various tribes of the peninsula were organizing themselves for the first time. One exhibit showed how the people of that day used primitive body-modification techniques to give themselves flat foreheads or pointy feet. On the second floor of the museum, there’s a room dedicated entirely to the relationship of the Japanese to Busan, which is more even-handed (and therefore, more interesting) than the “Japan=Villain” equations of the Modern History Museum.

How much enjoyment you get out of this museum is entirely a function of your interest in history. Nicely presented, informative and with plenty of information in English, we thought it was well done.

Location on our Busan Map
Busan Museum – Website
-Our Facebook Page

Busan-Museum
Busan-Museum-Statue-Park
Exhibition-Busan
Things-Do-Rainy-Day-Busan
Old Korean Stamps
Korean Books
Korean Box
Korean-Iron-Armor
Dragon Bell Korea
Byeonhan-Teeth-Pulling
First Plastic Surgery in Korea
Huff Puff Dragon
Horse Show Korea
Making-Pajeon-in-Korea
Drinking Soju in Korea
Korean Mail man
Harevest Festival Korea
Korean Dude
Old Busan Fortress Painting
Tilted Nose Korean Mask
Old Road Trip Korea
Melting-Iron-Busan
Old War Poster Busan
, , , , , , , , ,
July 19, 2012 at 10:01 am Comments (2)

Some Great South Korean Movies

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Buy Korean Movies Here

South Korea’s film industry has been absolutely killing it for the last decade or so, winning admirers across the globe for their character- and plot-driven movies which tackle every genre imaginable, from western to comedy to thrillers. Since arriving, we’ve been watching a lot of Korean flicks, and are almost always surprised and entertained — traditional Hollywood fare, this isn’t.

In our day jobs, we run a film recommendation website called Criticker, which has been very useful in helping us choose which Korean film to watch next. Here, for instance, is a list of the most popular Korean films of the past decade.

And here’s a quick list of the films which we’ve seen since arriving. This doesn’t include many of the most famous South Korean movies, which we had already watched (Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Oldboy, Lady Vengeance, The Host, Thirst, JSA). And there are a few we still have to get to — Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter and Spring, A Bittersweet Life, My Sassy Girl and The Brotherhood of War are all on our list. Any other must-see Korean films we should check out? What are your favorites?

-1 Dollar DVDs

Mother (2009)

Summary: A mother desperately searches for the killer that framed her son for their horrific murder

This goes to darker places than we were expecting, and we enjoyed it all the way through. Kim Hye-ja’s performance as the nameless Mother, who will do anything to protect her son, was incredible… especially as she slowly uncovers the truth.

5 Stars!
The Chaser (2008)

Summary: A pimp hunts down a pair of his missing girls.

A brutal, brilliant Korean thriller that completely ignores the normal plot devices of such films and presents a story which is impossible to predict. As the baby-faced serial killer, Jung-Woo Ha is positively terrifying (and kind of funny).

4 Stars!

Summary: A man named KIM jumps into the dark, quiet waters of the Han River. He wakes up and finds himself lying on strange ground, covered with sand. For a second, he thinks he is in heaven, but soon recognizes that he simply drifted to a nameless island in the river. In one of the riverside apartment buildings, there’s a girl who hasn’t ventured out of her room for years…

Most often, this whimsical romance is compared to Amelie — a film I really can’t stand. But this movie transcends its “quirky” characters, delivering a thoughtful message about humanity’s struggle to cope with modernity. One of the best, funniest, and most touching movies I’ve seen in a very long time.

5 Stars!

Summary: Sin-ae moves with her son Jun to Miryang, the town where her dead husband was born. As she tries to come to herself and set out on new foundations, another tragic event overturns her life.

Wonderful, unpredictable film. We loved the contrast between two types of people who can use someone’s grief for their own (not entirely selfish) ends… This film has one of the most honest and thoughtful depictions of modern Christianity that we’ve seen on film, and Do-yeon Jeon’s performance as the bereaved mother is astounding. You can’t look away.

5 Stars!

Summary: Jae-Young is an amateur prostitute who sleeps with men while her best friend Yeo-Jin “manages” her, fixing dates, taking care of the money and making sure the coast is clear.

Within the first few minutes, it’s clear that this movie would go in unexpected directions. Unconventional plots seem to be a hallmark of Korean cinema. This bizarre and occasionally brutal film earned director Ki-duk Kim (who also directed the wonderful 3-Iron) a prize at the Berlinale.

4 Stars!

Summary: A bounty hunter (the Good), a gangster (the Bad) and a thief (the Weird) match wits and many, many bullets in a quest for a mysterious treasure map in 1930s Manchuria. Over-the-top shootouts and chase scenes highlight this Korean homage to the Spaghetti Western. The cast includes the three biggest movie stars in Korea.

With Korea’s biggest actors, this was a major smash here. It’s a fun genre piece with some incredible action sequences set in the deserts of Manchuria, when Korea was under the thumb of the Japanese. It went on a little too long, though, for our taste.

3 Stars!

Summary: A secret agent tracks a serial killer who murdered his fiancée.

Very exciting, very brutal, very unpleasant. A horrifically bloody, unrelenting thriller which I kept averting my eyes from and praying for to end — I actually screamed out loud once. It was excellently made and exciting throughout, but only recommended for those who like their hyper-violence extra hyper.

4 Stars!

Summary: Based on a true story, Memories of Murder is a Korean suspense thriller offering an unusual fusion of death and laughter, while recollecting truly nightmarish events.

A gripping detective story which doesn’t shy away from the fact that many crimes are almost impossible to solve. The characters are well-developed, and their progression through the film is both natural and surprising. Given the fact that it’s a true story, there’s a surprising amount of humor. Quentin Tarantino named this one of his favorite films of the past twenty years.

5 Stars!

Summary: An ex-special agent CHA Tae-shik’s only connection to the rest of the world is a little girl, So-mi, who lives nearby. Her mother, Hyo-jeong smuggles drugs from a drug trafficking organization and entrusts Tae-shik with the product, without letting him know. The traffickers find out about her smuggling and kidnap both Hyo-jeong and So-mi. The gang promises to release them if Tae-shik makes a delivery for them, however it actually is a larger plot to eliminate a rival drug ring leader.

Like a Korean version of The Professional, except much better and more brutal. South Korean model/heartthrob/actor Won Bin excels in the role of Unstoppable Avenger, and the action is almost relentless. Includes the sickest knife fight we’ve ever seen on film, and earns an extra star just for that.

4 Stars!

Summary: A tilt-a whirl genre-blender that turns film history against itself to create one of the most savage, affecting and inspired anti-violence movies ever made. This is a movie that defies all marketing labels and is exactly what it wants to be: like nothing you’ve ever seen before.

We weren’t exactly sure what kind of film this was supposed to be. Comedy? It was pretty unfunny, especially during the… you know… bloody torture scenes. While watching this, we began to suspect that Koreans just throw a bloody torture scene into every movie they make.

2 Stars!

Summary: A girl who thinks she is a combat cyborg checks into a mental hospital, where she encounters other psychotics. Eventually, she falls for a man who thinks he can steal people’s souls.

WAY too cutesy, and not nearly funny or endearing enough to justify it. With a wide-ranging cast of wacky inmates, we kept hoping for a fire to break out in the asylum that would kill them all.

2 Stars!

Summary: Joong Rae goes on a road trip to the west coast with his friend Chang Wook and Chang Wook’s girlfriend Moon Suk. In the beautiful beach setting of Shinduri, Joong Rae and Moon Suk find themselves attracted to each other and spend a passionate night together. But where does life go the morning after?

A director’s-showpiece kind of film, with long, languorous shots and emotive performances. It’s all well-done, and is refreshing after the frequent gore of Korean cinema, but gets very long after awhile, and you can easily start to despise the selfish main characters.

3 Stars!

, , , , , , , , , , , ,
July 15, 2012 at 10:50 am Comment (1)

The Hike to Songjeong Beach

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Travel Insurance – Sign Up Online

At the far northeastern end of Busan, Songjeong Beach is a more beautiful and far less popular stretch of sand than the city beaches of Haeundae or Gwangalli. Although you can get there with bus or taxi, the best way to arrive is over a gorgeous three-kilometer hike through the woods.

Busan Beaches

The hike begins near the Jangsan metro station and, like all walking trails in Korea, is well-marked and easy to follow. There’s some workout equipment along the way, but the real reason to tackle the hike is for the amazing views over the sea and the forest valley.

Halfway through, the peaceful silence we’d been enjoying was interrupted by an outlandishly loud alarm coming from somewhere down the coast. After it had sounded for a few minutes, a woman came on the loudspeaker, saying something in Korean. We waited hopefully for an English translation, but it never appeared. And then, the alarm again for at least five minutes. We were all alone in the woods, unable to judge the reactions of others. Were people in the city running in panic for the nearest bunker? Had North Korea pressed the big red button? Had the woman provided instructions on surviving the imminent nuclear holocaust?

Eventually, we saw a family hiking on the trail, at a calm, un-panicked pace. The Korean government tests the alarm system about once a month, bringing all traffic to a standstill, and this must have one such time.

Songjeong Beach awaited us at the end of our hike. Unlike the city beaches, there were no other foreigners here, just big groups of college-age kids playing organized games, and throwing girls into the water — with somewhat more brutality than we Westerners employ. We watched them for awhile, waving off their attempts to get us to join in, and walked to the end of the beach.

A small, wooded peninsula called Jukdo Park caps the beach, providing a shaded relaxation area and a pavilion for views which stretch out over the sea and back towards the beach. There’s less development here than at Busan’s other beaches, and the result is a much prettier panorama. So far, this is one of our favorite spots in the city, and definitely worth the effort of reaching. And if you’re not feeling up to the short hike, a taxi from Jangsan costs about $2.50.

Location of the Hike’s Start
-Bolivia Travel Blog

High-Tech-Hike
Hiking Korea
Urban Garden Korea
Korean Trolls
Geocaching-Korea
Mike Hike
Scary Ass Spider
Fucking Korea
Hoola Hoop Dude
Coastal-Hike-Busan
Busan Blog
Korean Sea
Korea Photos
Roof Top Work Out
Songjeong-Beach
Ghost Ship Korea
Girl-in-Trouble
Korean-Pants-Dropping
Korean Pain
Korean Water Bombs
Korean-Group-Hug
Korean Hipsters
Alone Forever
Korean Surfer
Surfing in Korea
Bitch Volley Balls
Korean Art
Songjeong-Busan
Modern Art Busan
Holy Rock Busan

, , , , , , , , , ,
June 25, 2012 at 12:23 am Comments (0)

Jagalchi Fish Market

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Please Like Us on Facebook

The largest fish market in South Korea is found in downtown Busan, next to the busy shopping area of Nampo-dong and adjacent to the Lotte Aqua Mall. That it occupies such a valuable, central location speaks to how important the fish trade has always been to the city.

Cheap Fish

The market is massive and seems to go on forever. Thousands of stands with what must be billions of fish compete with each other for customers, and there’s no doubt who’s in charge: the hardened, crafty women known as the Jagalchi Ajumas. “Ajuma” means “married woman”, and these ladies conduct almost all the business at the market, whether that’s the business of beheading a fish, prying open a clam, or haggling with a customer. Most likely, they could do all of these things simultaneously.

We were amazed during our visit; the Jagalchi Market is like an aquarium, with every sort of fish imaginable and some species I’d never seen before. Among countless others, I saw colorful shrimp the size of trout, blowfish, shark, sea urchins, monkfish, mollusks, and the slightly off-putting penis fish.

Of course, the big difference between this and an aquarium is that these fish are waiting to die. To be ripped apart in the most horrific ways imaginable and then consumed. I saw a group of eels who had been skinned alive, still squiggling around in their pail. There’s enough material here to fuel a thousand gore flicks… just substitute “human” for “octopus”. That’s what was running through my head, as I watched a group of plucky octopuses working together to climb out of their bucket, only to be whacked in the head by their insidious Ajuma keeper. Soon, she would choose one to hack to pieces and then serve as a still-twitching meal. Hollywood, take note.

There are a few different sections of the Jagalchi market. We started in the outdoor zone, with a nice view over the port, and then moved into the Dry Fish area, where dried sardines, kelp and cod are sold in unbelievable volume. The centerpiece of the market, though, is the new Shindonga building, built in 2006. The exterior design features white winged shapes, creating the impression of giant seagulls descending onto the building. Inside are yet more stands and restaurants where you can eat sashimi; similar to the Millak sashimi hall we visited, but on a different scale.

We had a great time in Jagalchi — it’s one of the absolute highlights of Busan.

Location on our Busan Map
-Cheap Places To Stay in Busan

Photographer Busan
Shopping in Korea
Snail Cleaning
Korean Snail
Busan-Ajuma
Dry Fish Market Busan
Dry Me Some Fish
Waiting For Costumers
Good Posture
Fried Eel
Baked Fish
Jagalchi-Ajuma
Jagalchi
Jagalchi-Market
Korean Manta
Korean Squid
Life Fish
Oh Crab
OMG-Everything-So-cheap
Silver Fish
Skinned Fish
Dry-Silver-Fish
Lunch Time
Rusty Boats
Ship Blog
Korean Fisherboat
Night Fishing Korea
Korean LOL
Jagalchi-Snack
Harbor Dudes
Jagalchi-Nompo-Dong
Korean Bridge
Fish-Statue
View-From-Jagalchi-Market
Korean Fish Market
Fishy Hangout
Fish DAy
Humor Fish
Hook Up Korea
Huge Fishmarket
Very Cool Fish
Super Fresh Seafood Korea
Pretty Shell
Jagalchi-Restaurants
Working Hard in Korea
Snoozing Korea

, , , , , , , ,
June 24, 2012 at 2:32 am Comments (3)

The Strange Creatures of Busan

Add to Flipboard Magazine.
Crazy-Korean-Dogs

Busan is definitely a city with a lot of character. Wait… no, I mean “characters”. A lot of strange characters! We’re impressed by the towering skyscrapers and challenged by the bizarre foods, but it’s the funny animals, people and mascots of the city that we find the most entertaining. Painted dogs, monster-size lobsters, seductive wooden cows, and smiling dumplings are just some of the characters we’ve captured in this latest dump of photos from Busan.

-Follow us on Twitter

Psycho Dog
Roof Topping Korea
Tilt Shift Busan
Public Announcement
Roof Top Garden
Take a Seat
Show Time korea
Steaming-Lobster-Busan
Thumbs Up Cow
Busan Secrets
Bus Restaurant Busan
Dinner With A View
Fish Tunnel
Happy Dumpling
Korean Oppa
Nose Cleaning
LOL Wings
Plastic Fish
Neon Fish
Lonely in Busan
Korean Shapes
Retro Phone Korea
Korean Beach Bums
Horny For Sofu
Hot Korean
Beach Ball
Friendly Handshake
Korean Birds
Weird Buildings
Buildings Busan
Trunk Puller
4D Korea
Full Moon Busan
Rainbow Building
Seaside Moon
Night Photographer
Late Night Korea
Baseball in Korea
Busan At Night
Breakdancing Busan
, , , , , , , , ,
June 13, 2012 at 10:11 am Comment (1)

Return to Mt. Geumjeongsan

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

On our first visit to the top of Mt. Geumjeongsan, we had ascended in a cable car and hiked from the South to East Gate. It was an all-day excursion, but we were only able to see a fraction of the gigantic mountain fortress which extends across the summit, and so vowed to return. Our second trip would start at the Northern Gate, bring us to Godangbong Peak and end with a well-deserved feast in the village of Sanseong.

Geumjeongsan-Hike

A trail found on the side of Beomeosa Temple leads through a bizarre rock field in the forest, before turning uphill. We climbed for nearly an hour until arriving at the fortress’ North Gate. Our legs were already rubbery and the day of hiking hadn’t yet begun! Before setting off, we took a break at the ancient gate, which is topped by a gazebo and had recently been renovated.

From the North Gate, the walk to Godangbong Peak took about 90 minutes. Halfway there, we took a detour to the Geumsem “Golden Well”, a rock formation in the shape of a bowl which collects rain water. This is where the golden fish who gave Beomeosa Temple its name descended from heaven. We had to use a set of knotted ropes to get up and over the rock. On the way down the other side, my foot slipped and I came crashing down. Luckily, I escaped with just a skinned elbow and bruised ego, but have made a mental note to remove “Mountain Climbing” from my list of future activities.

Natural Climber
Looking good, 3.54 seconds before slipping

At 801.5 meters above sea level, Godangbong Peak is the highest point on the mountain, and the views over Busan were stunning, even though the day was somewhat hazy. From here, you can see the walls of the fortress and gain a good sense of its immense size.

After returning to the North Gate, we continued on to the Fourth Watchtower, passing Wonhyobong Peak along the way, which is a hill most notable for its amazing view of the curving fortress wall. The path connecting the North to the East Gate is extremely popular — there were a ton of other hikers, and this was on a Tuesday; it must be awful on summer weekends. But at the Fourth Watchtower, we took a detour to the south and the crowds disappeared. The path to Jangdae led us softly downhill through some beautiful forest areas. Jangdae is found roughly in the middle of the fortress and served as its command post. Today, it’s a secluded and comfortable place to take a rest, which is exactly what we did.

From Jangdae, we found the road which brought us to Sanseong Village, famous for its cuisine. Black goat, duck bulgogi and a rice liquor are the local specialties. We grabbed a bottle of the liquor, ordered a heaping portion of duck bulgogi and sat down outside at a great restaurant overlooking the river valley, to eat our richly deserved meal. We had combined this hike with our visit to Beomeosa, making this an unforgettable, but very, very long day.

Location of the North Gate | Godangbong Peak | Jangdae

Korean Hikers
Hiking in Busan
Beautiful Busan
North-Gate-Geumjeongsan
Secret Hike
Korean-Tree
Rock-climbing-in-Busan
Hiking-blog
Peak-Mount-Geumjeongsan
Geumjeongsan
Boulder Korea
Busan Nature
Crazy Busan
/Golden-Spring-Geumjeongsan
The Golden Spring of legend
Korea-Electricity
Hazy Day in Busan
Mountain Stairs
Peak Bridge
Looky
Busan Picnic
We love Hiking
Crazy For Hiking
Water Fountain
Korean Bug
Korean Butterfly
Korean Nature
Bunny-Coffee-Shop
Korean Rice Wine
Sanseong-Village
, , , , , , , , , , ,
June 8, 2012 at 5:52 am Comments (2)

A Ferry to the Oryukdo Islands

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Korean Folklore

We first spotted the Oryukdo Islands toward the end of our hike down the coast of Igidae Park. A string of rocky and uninhabited landmasses, these islands are the most notable feature along Busan’s coastline. In order to get a better look, we took an evening ferry trip which looped around them.

Busan Islands

The ferry left from the Mipo terminal at Haeundae Beach, and cost ₩19,500 ($17.55) apiece. A little expensive for the hour-long round trip, but the views of Haeundae, Gwangalli Beach and the Diamond Bridge were worth it.

For the fishermen and merchants approaching Busan from the sea, the Oryukdo Islands have always been the city’s symbol. The profile of the five (or six) islands is certainly memorable. The name “oryukdo” comes from the fact that, depending upon the tide, there appear to be either five (o) or six (yuk) islands (do). Except for the furthest in the chain, on which a lighthouse has been built, the islands are completely barren. Nothing much could be built on these craggy hills of rock.

The evening ferry runs approximately once an hour from Mipo and more frequently during the weekends. We left at 17:10, but could have delayed our journey by an hour in order to see the sun set behind the city.

The Oryukdo Islands on our Busan Map
Catch the boat from here
-For 91 Days on Facebook (please make our day and like us)

Korea Schiff
Fishing in Busan
Korean Birds
Busan Skyline
Gwangan Bridge
Police Boat Busan
High Speed Ferry Busan
Busan
Korea Korea
Oryukdo-Islands
Busan Stairs
Busan Blog
Busan Harbor
Korean Air
Sunset Busan

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,
May 30, 2012 at 9:36 am Comments (0)

Samgwangsa Under a Blanket of Lanterns

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Learn Korean

Set at the foot of the Baegyangsan Mountain in central Busan, Samgwangsa is a massive temple with enough room for 10,000 worshipers. And there were approximately that many present when we visited on a balmy May evening shortly before Buddha’s birthday.

Korea Blog

We had initially toured Samgwangsa a few weeks earlier, while the lanterns were still being set up. It was the first Buddhist temple we’d been to in Korea and impressed us with both its size and location. As was the case in Sri Lanka, Korean temples seem to be set in places of extreme natural beauty. Samgwangsa boasts an incredible view over Busan, and hiking trails can be found in the mountain forest behind it.

Built in 1969, Samgwangsa is not the most ancient or traditional of temples, but that doesn’t make it any less inspiring. The main prayer hall is stunning; large and intricately decorated with hundreds of small Buddha statues lining the walls. There’s a nine-story pagoda dedicated to the future reunification of Korea, and a giant bell in the courtyard. Within the complex’s various buildings, men and women were either worshiping or working. I’m not sure if this is true, but Samgwangsa seems to house a large number of senior citizens; we passed a few rooms with older women sitting cross-legged on the floor watching TV.

I’m glad we had the initial visit, because the temple was unrecognizable when we returned during the lantern festival, buried under a blanket of light. The lanterns, strung up in unbroken lines throughout the complex are each paid for by a family, who get to write their names and wishes on them. This practice dates back centuries; in Korea, lighting a lantern symbolizes a dedication to committing good deeds, and shining a light on the world’s darkness. Whatever the reasoning, the glow emitted from thousands of colorful lanterns is majestic.

Location on our Busan Map
-Cheap Flights To Korea

Samgwangsa
Korea Tradition
Buddha Box
Buddha Lottery
Virgin Temple
Buddha Sign
Dragon Art
Busan At Night
Samgwangsa-Lantern-Temple
Visit Busan
Busan 2012
Busan Travel Guide
Night Walk Busan
Red Lantern
Photographer in Korea
Busan-Korean-Photographer
Busan Blog
Dragon-Festival-Busan
Dragon Fight
For-91-Days-in-Busan
Fruit Lantern
Korea Travel Blog
Tigger Korea
Festivals in Korea
Korean Buddha Offering
Stretch Photographer
Korea-Portraits

, , , , , , , , , ,
May 29, 2012 at 6:44 am Comments (4)

« Older Posts