Busan Map
Site Index
Contact
Random
Our Travel Books
Advertising / Press

The APEC House and Dongbaek Park

Hotels in Busan

The Nurimaru House was built for the 2005 APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) Summit, which brought together the leaders of its twenty-one member nations. With a striking location in Dongbaekseom Park overlooking Haeundae Beach, the house now serves as a memorial to the meeting.

Apec Building Busan>

Dongbaekseom used to be an island, before a natural accumulation of earth and sand attached it to the mainland. The suffix -seom means island, and the dongbaek is a kind of tree. Today, the park is a beautifully wooded nature preserve, offering a number of trails and unbeatable views of Haeundae Beach. A popular coastal path connects the beach to the APEC House, which is found among amid camellia and pine trees.

Along the coastal trail, the large statue of a forlorn mermaid is unmissable. According to legend, this is the Princess of Topaz from the Kingdom of Naranda, found far beyond the sea. She was married off to the King of Mungungnara, and now sits immobile, crying for her lost country. Her name comes from the topaz bead given to her by her grandmother, which she grips during her endless lamentations for home. It would be hard to imagine that this story isn’t an allegory for the Koreans who left home during the struggles of the Japanese occupation and Korean War.

The Nurimaru APEC House was built for one solitary purpose and, like the Mermaid, now sits frozen in time. During the 2005 APEC Summit, leaders from the countries of the Pacific Rim discussed a number of topics of common interest, such as Copyright Protection and Aviary Flu defenses. Possibly its most notable achievement was to get George W. Bush into a Korean Hanbok. I don’t like the guy, but this isn’t actually a bad look for him.

Touring the APEC House was kind of strange. We got to see the round table at which the various heads of state sat, and were able to admire one of their meals. There was some information about what was discussed, and about each member state. But that was about it. By now, this incredible house, which showcases Korean architecture in a pristine location, should have found new life — it’s not as though the 2005 APEC Summit was a meeting of such historic importance that it needs to be forever memorialized. Put a plaque up or something, and move on!

Location of the APEC House on our Map
-Hostels in Busan

UFO LANDED BUSAN
Busan Blog
Apec-2005
Apec-Times
Apex
Apec
Royal-Meal-Apec
Busan Lounge
Busan-Lighthouse
Islands of Busan
Fisher Island Busan
It-was-THIIIIIS-BIG
Fishing in Busan
Busy Busan
Swing Bridge Busan
Dongbaekseom-Island
Hikingin Busan
Korean Dog
Jet Ski Busan
Busan-Mermaid

, , , , , , , , , ,
July 16, 2012 at 7:57 am Comments (3)

Haedong Yonggungsa Temple

For 91 Days Travel Books

Haedong Yonggungsa (해동용궁사) is unique among Busan’s Buddhist temples in that it lies not in the mountains, but on the seafront. It was founded in 1376, during the Goryeo Dynasty, and completely destroyed during the Japanese invasions. Though the current construction only dates from the 1970s, the temple is a beautiful and much-beloved center of worship. In fact, I can’t imagine it being any more popular.

Haedong Yonggungsa Temple

Of course, we were visiting on the day before Buddha’s birthday, when legions of the faithful had shown up. This was definitely the only time in my life I’ve waited in a 45-minute line to enter a temple or church. But it was a sunny morning, and the queue gave us time to take in the beauty of the temple from afar. Haedong Yonggungsa looks out over the sea, with tall dagobas erected on the rock above, and has as its centerpiece a three-story pagoda protected by four lions. Inside the pagoda are bone relics brought to Korea by a Sri Lankan monk… a neat connection to our previous home.

According to the temple’s website, its motto is “At least one of your wishes will be answered here through your heartful prayers.” That’s hopeful, and at least more optimistic than the Christian slogans I grew up with like, “Repent, ye sinner”. The Buddhist Goddess of Mercy, thought to reside in the sea, is the main deity at Haedong Yonggungsa. Apparently, she’s appeared to people here, and saying her name over and over will result in good fortune.

It was a little hard to appreciate all the details of the temple, due to the celebrations underway. Lanterns were strung up everywhere, hiding from view anything higher than a couple meters, including a statue of the mercy goddess. And man, do Koreans love taking photographs. You couldn’t move an inch without accidentally intruding in someone else’s frame. It was a little amusing to hear Jürgen — who never stops taking pictures — complain about other people doing the same.

Location on our Busan Map
-Travel Insurance Worldwide

Fear Korea
Korean Monkey
Year-of-the-in-Korea
Elephant Boy Korea
Dragon Street Light
Buddha Tower
Lantern Base
Busan Temple Work
Gate Temple
Visit Busan
Busan 2012
Korea Dagobas
Picture Manicas
Photo Shooting in Korea
Korean Couple
Trapped Dragon
Lantern Festival in Busan
Luck Turtle
Holy Turtle
Lantern Reflection
Lucky Pigs
Blue Shirt Lantern
Buddhist Monk Hangout
Hidden Buddha
FAT BUDDHA
Golden Buddha
Wrapped Buddha
Super Cute Buddha
Buddha Tower
Buddha Babies
Buddha Baby Tree
Buddha Garden
Rich Buddha
Stone Lantern Korea
Buddha Well
Korea
Korean Festival
Korean Contrast
Busan Festivals
Temple Roof
Lotus Lantern
FFFUUUUUUUUUUU
Busan Blog
Flights To Korea Deal
, , , , , , , , , , , ,
May 28, 2012 at 5:47 am Comment (1)

Hiking through Igidae Park

Hiking Gear

The mountains and hills of Busan are easily its best feature, both helping to confine the city’s sprawl and offering parks and natural refuges for residents to escape the stress of everyday life. Among Busan’s wide range of nature walks, the one spanning Igidae Park is among the most popular. We hiked along its 5.2 kilometer coastal trail on a sunny afternoon.

Igidae-Hike

Jangsanbong Mountain occupies the stretch of coastline just south of Gwangalli Beach, and had been under military control until 1993. The whole mountain is now open to the public, though nearly all visitors stick to the popular coastal walk, which takes about two-and-a-half hours. It’s a perfect hike, with magnificent views over the ocean and city, and only slightly strenuous.

Possibly even more than the beautiful nature, the path’s flawless infrastructure most impressed us. Steps and handrails in perfect condition, plentiful information posted in a variety of languages, modern suspension bridges, benches wherever the view is especially good, and even toilets are found along the trail. Busan has clearly invested a lot into Igidae Park, and it’s heartening to see a city so concerned with improving the quality of life of its citizens.

The name “Igidae” comes from a legend set during the Japanese occupation of Busan. Shortly after conquering the city, the Japanese had a victory celebration at the fortress on Jangsanbong Mountain. A few Korean “entertaining women”, or Gisaengs, were brought along to dance for their new lords. Two of them, possessed by nationalistic furor, grabbed one of the drunken Japanese officers and jumped off a cliff, sacrificing themselves for a small taste of Korean revenge (which I bet tastes like kimchi). The name “Igidae” refers to the “two Gisaengs”.

The hike went by in a flash. The park was decently crowded for a weekday afternoon, mostly older people out for a bit of exercise, but we also spotted a lot of fishermen along the coast. Though clearly marked, the path allows for digressions up into the hills, or down to the water. On one of these, we found an expanse of rock marked by the footprints of an Ultrasaurus — an awesomely-named dinosaur native to Korea. Further on, there was a curious rock formation, said to look like Buddha carrying a baby. To me, it looked like an old Korean woman with a bundle on her head. You judge:

Stone Tower Busan

As we approached the southern end of the hike, the Oryukdo Islands came into view. These five rocky islands are just offshore, and uninhabited. They can be circled by ferry — an adventure we would soon embark on.

Igidae is an excellent, stress-free hike, easily accessible from the city. If its popularity on a Thursday afternoon is any indication, I’m guessing the narrow paths can get claustrophobic on a sunny summer weekend. But regardless of the number of other hikers, an enjoyable day out is almost guaranteed.

The Location of the Hike’s Start on our Map
-Have you read any of our travel books? If so please leave a review and make our day.

Gwangali Bridge
Hang Bridge Korea
Power Hiker
Korea Bridge
Busan Wandern
Busan Nature
Igidae-Park
Lonely in Korea
Korean Stoner
Peace Out Korea
Fresh Algies
Little Stonkers
Ultrasaurus-Foot-Prints
Korean Monster
Hiking in Busan
Coastal Hike Busan
Hiking Rest
Sound of Music Korea
Wired Korea
Busan Islands
Pirate Ship Busan
Weird Nature Korea
End Of A Hike
, , , , , , , ,
May 21, 2012 at 7:54 am Comment (1)