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Bujeon Market Town

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Everything Is 1 Dollar Here

The largest market in Busan, and almost definitely the biggest I’ve ever visited anywhere, is in the central neighborhood of Bujeon. Calling it a market town is no mere hyperbole — just the covered portion comprises a full grid of streets and alleys, and you can easily get lost in its chaotic, densely crowded streets.

Bujeon-Market-Town

If Bujeon were closer to our apartment, we’d be there daily. Everything under the sun is sold at the market, from food to household goods and electronics. We saw a woman peddling puppies (presumably as pets), a flea market of vintage clothing, bakeries selling sweets, squiggling octopuses and squids. Pots, pans, aprons, fruits, spices. Everything a Korean kitchen could ever possibly need. Should your kitchen need a cook, I’m sure you could talk one of the thousands of sweet old ladies working there into coming home with you.

And it’s unbelievably cheap. A bag of chili powder which was twice the size of the bag I’d just bought from a supermarket was half the price at Bujeon. For less than a buck, Jürgen and I shared a strange rice-cake which was shaped and served like a corn dog, complete with ketchup and mustard. Then, after being offered samples, I picked up two delicious green-tea doughnuts for about $0.60.

Bujeon has its own subway stop, and is within easy walking distance of Seomyeon, which is basically the apex of downtown Busan. Definitely worth a look.

Location on our Busan Map
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Biking in Korea
Shopping Kart Korea
Smoking Worker
Busan Market
Einkaufen in Busan
Korean Signs
Caught in the Act
Kimchi Love
May I help You
Korean Past
Shopping in Busan
Shopping Dance
Stylish Shopping
Spicy Korea
Spicy Dude
Watering Seafood
Stupid Worker
Buy Kimchi
Find The Penis
Strange Snack
Korean Beans
Liquor
Korean Sprouts
Pickled Korea
Noodles Korea
Plastic Cock
Eel Market
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Ginseng Lady
Fresh Ginseng Busan

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June 30, 2012 at 11:34 pm Comments (0)

Busan Food Journal, Part Five

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Korean Cookbooks

We’re more than halfway through out time in Busan, and still haven’t gotten sick of the food. There’s a lot more variety to the cuisine than we had expected, especially once you add in the Japanese and Chinese (and Thai and American and Vietnamese and so on) influences. This week, we tried a couple of non-Korean places out, gave in to our pizza addiction, and went against better judgment to sample ginseng wine.

Food Journal: Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part Four | Part Six

Sundubu Baekban (순두부백반)
Sundubu-Baekban

We were tipped off to Nampo’s extremely popular restaurant Dolgorae (돌고래) by one of our readers, who provided exact instructions as to the location. Thank god, because we’d have never found it ourselves! The specialty in this second-floor eatery, tucked away on one of Nampo’s million alleys, is Sundubu Baekban, which is a hearty and delicious tofu soup. I had the Doenjang Jjigae, which was similar but with seafood mixed in. Dolgorae is a real find… anyone else who has great tips like this: let us know! [More Pics]

Mr. Pizza
Mr-Pizza-Korea

Mr. Pizza (미스터피자 in Korean, which transliterates as Mi-seu-teo Pi-ja) is probably the most popular pizza franchise in Busan, with branches found all over the place. We treated ourselves to a trip here on a lazy Sunday afternoon, and enjoyed every bite of our greasy “New York Style” pizza. But we regretted it immediately afterward, just like we always do after eating this kind of food. [More Pics]

Insamju (인삼주)

In Korea, ginseng is big business. Entire stores dedicate themselves to the ugly root, selling giant glass jars holding monstrous specimens. There are a lot of ginseng health drinks, but I was surprised to find this ginseng wine at the grocery store, and decided to give it a shot. It’s awful. It tastes like… well, like wine made from ginseng. It’s supposedly good against sexual dysfunction. Too bad you’ll be too busy vomiting to have much fun in the sack.

Sweet & Sour Cocktail Shop (짬뽕 탕수육 전문점)
Black-Bean-Paste-Noodles

After Japanese, Chinese is probably the second-most popular type of foreign food in Busan. You can usually identify a Chinese restaurant by red lanterns hanging outside the doorway, or pictures of the black-bean noodles which they all seem to offer. We went to the Sweet & Sour Cocktail Shop — I have no idea if that’s the actual English name, but this is how Google Translate handles “짬뽕 탕수육 전문점”. At any rate, it’s an excellent restaurant near Gwangalli Beach (location), where we tried out the delicious black-bean noodles for the first time, with a side of fried dumplings.

Galbitang
Galbi-BBQ-Busan

A friend took us to “Galbi Aid” (rough translation of 원조 갈비찜), a great restaurant near the Yeonsanyeok Metro station (location). This neighborhood is home to a lot of big companies, and filled with the kind of places exhausted businessmen like to frequent after a long day of work, like karaoke bars, hostess clubs and no-nonsense restaurants. We had Galbitang, a spicy stew of short-ribs and veggies. After we’d scooped away most of the soup into our bellies, the waitress brought rice, which she mixed into the bowl for a second round, which was just as delicious as the first. [More Pics]

Ikeman Bento (이케맨벤또)
Busan Bento

During our exploration of the Kyungsung University neighborhood, I spotted a sign advertising anime. I’m a comics fan, so eagerly ascended the to the third floor, where I expected to find geeks thumbing through Detective Conan. Instead, I had discovered a Japanese Bento restaurant (location). My initial disappointment quickly disappeared, and we sat down for a meal. You get one main dish surrounded by nine side items in a tic-tac-toe-shaped box. I had smoked salmon, and Juergen went with teriyaki chicken. The food was great, the prices incredible, and the restaurant was kitschy, cute and popular. Highly recommended. [More Pics]

Okkudak Chicken
Perfect Chicken Meal

Our visit to Mr. Pizza might not have been worth writing home about, but soon enough, we found ourselves craving The Unhealth, yet again, and let our noses guide us to Okkudak in Kyungsung (location), where the specialty is fried chicken. Now this was an artery-clogging meal that we could get behind! Garlic-fried chunks of chicken with a heaping side order of cheesy baked sweat potato puree. And beer. And joy.

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More Pics from Dolgorae
Dolgorae-Restaurant-Busan
Sneaky Cook
Korean-Chopsticks
Restaurant-Guide-Busan
Doenjang-Jjigae
Off-The-Beaten-Path-Korea
More Pics from Mr. Pizza
Mr-Pizza-Busan
All You Can Eat Mr. Pizza
More Pics of Galbitang
Galbi-BBQ
Galbi Rice
More Pics from Ikeman Bento
Cute-Japanese-Place-Busan
White Water
Japanese Wooden Spoon
Stone Travel Blog
Yummy Salmon
Bento Busan

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June 29, 2012 at 2:28 pm Comments (0)

Busan’s Trick Eye Museum

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Books On Optical Illusion

The only thing which Koreans love more than taking pictures is having their picture taken. So I shouldn’t have been surprised to find in Busan an entire museum dedicated to the art of posing for funny photos. But still… I was surprised. The Trick Eye Museum, underneath the Heosimcheong Spa, is one of the most bizarre places we’ve been in a long time.

Trapped By Snake

If you don’t like having your picture taken, stay far away from the Trick Eye Museum, which is also not recommended for anyone who’s overly serious, or those who have any semblance of pride. Basically, if you’re not willing to act like an idiot in front of the camera, you won’t have any fun here. But everyone else, and especially kids, should prepare for a good time.

The entire point of this “museum” is to provide setups for funny pictures. An upside-down room makes it look like you’re standing on the ceiling. Stand in front of Mona Lisa with a paintbrush. Lay down on the floor and hang on for dear life to the painting of a cliff. Peer into a gentleman’s briefs. Wrap yourself in the coils of a serpent. Crawl into bed with a surprisingly buxom Mike. Will the hilarity ever stop?! No, it won’t… it goes on and on, for room after room after room. This place is huge and if you haven’t had your fill of funny-posing pictures by the end of it, then you, my friend, have some issues.

Juergen and I visited right after a three-hour session in the Heosimcheong Spa, and were loosened up enough to throw ourselves into the picture-taking with abandon. After all, we’d just spent hours prancing around naked in front of other men, so screwing up our faces for a silly photo wasn’t exactly a tall order. Please enjoy our photos … if you can stomach the sad spectacle of two grown men acting without dignity.

Location on our Busan Map
-Hotels in Busan

Strone Like Hercules
Korean Cliff Hanger
Naked and Stinky
Roman King
Eating Human Flesh
Best Friends
Blown Wind
Bubble Boy
Fun in Busan
FUUU Korean Drivers
Grabbing TITS
Hello Friends
Horny for Beer
Korean Circus Clown
Mike to the Rescue
Naked in Busan FKK
Sneak Peak
Perverted Photographer
Piss on Me
Yoga in Busan
Angry Bird

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June 28, 2012 at 8:46 am Comments (36)

Oncheon’s Heosimcheong – The Largest Spa in Asia

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Find A Spa Near You

For our second Korean jimjilbang experience, we decided to go big. The Heomsimcheong Spa in the neighborhood of Oncheon claims to be the largest spa fed by a natural hot spring in Asia. The popular complex, which also bills itself the Grand Hot Spring, includes a full hotel, an excellent brewery on the bottom floor and of course, a full array of baths and saunas.

Jjimjilbang-Oncheon-Heosimcheong

Later this week, I’ll be taking advantage of South Korea’s incredible medical tourism and having my eyes Lasik-ed. I only mention it because, throughout my life, I’ve encountered a mere handful of occasions where terrible vision has been a gift, rather than a curse. For example: bright lights look like glowing orbs of color, which can turn an evening cityscape or a Christmas tree into something abstract and beautiful. And people really are less likely to hit the guy wearing glasses.

But in the Heosimcheong Spa, I discovered another benefit of bad eyes. Without my contacts in or glasses on, the naked human body disappears into a single flesh-colored blur. I can see the human-sized shape, but no details… and the horrors of jimjilbangs are all in the details.

Heosimcheong cost ₩8000 ($7.20) to enter, worth the price just for the bathing area, which is in a giant salon capped by an opaque dome. Under the soft natural light, we cooked ourselves in hot tubs, gasped for oxygen in steam saunas, sprang in and out of freezing ice baths, and sat underneath heavy waterfall streams that pounded our necks and shoulders. It was crowded, but the other people didn’t bug me much — this time, I was almost blind, and couldn’t tell if they were staring at me.

After paying an extra ₩2000 apiece for funky pajamas that M.C. Hammer would have been proud of (and possibly designed), we entered the mixed-gender jimjilbang area, with relaxation and steam rooms. It was kind of a disappointment, with just a couple separate rooms and a very active, hyper population of kids running around. There was an igloo-shaped ice room, and a yellow steam room… nicely done, but there wasn’t much variety. After a nap and a facial mask, which was provided for free, we were done.

Well, we weren’t quite done. On the bottom floor of the complex is a gigantic brewery, serving German-inspired beers. At night, this is apparently a Busan hot-spot, with a Bulgarian band that sings in a variety of languages while intoxicated Koreans get down and dirty on the dance floor. Sadly, we missed this, but the beer was excellent.

Location on our Busan Map
-Find us on Facebook

Biggest-Spa-in-Asia
Naked in Korea
Jjimjilbang-Busan
Funky-in-Busan
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June 26, 2012 at 11:48 pm Comments (7)

Relaxing in Busan and Other Pics

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Read Any Of Our Books? Please Make Our Day And Leave A Review Here

How To Relax in Busan

If you’re not in one of the city’s numerous spas, the preferred method of relaxation seems to be playing on your smart phone. On the subway, in the park, at dinner, walking down the street, while driving, while talking to your friends. At the beach. Busanites are plugged into their phones in a way that seems obsessive. But they always look like they’re having fun, so who are we to judge?

And as soon as we can, we’ll be buying phones just like theirs! Enjoy this latest collection of random photos taken around this always-on-the-go city.

-Travel Insurance For Your Korea Trip

Bus-Driving-With-Feet
Ahio-Captain
Busan Art Space
Classic Busan Girl
Coffee Science
Drooling Korea
Editorial-Photographer-Busan
House of Penis
Lotte Loghthouse
Korean Hipster Bike
Korean Stop Sign
Mint Cross Walk
Korean Subway
Korean Cat Walk
Mirror Shark
Moped Korea
Park Wherever
Pig Fest
Plastic Warrior
So much Fun Busan
Roads of Korea
Take-Out-Disco
Sorry No Soju
Very Strange Korea
Weird Street Art
Monster Cute
Super Cute Babies
Humid Summers in Busan
Piff Square
Sneaky Photographer
Say No To Crack
Cornered At Night
Fine Art Photography

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June 26, 2012 at 8:55 am Comments (2)

The Charlie Brown Cafe

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The Complete Peanuts Collections

During our initial exploration of the Pusan National University neighborhood in the north of Busan, we happened upon a strange cultural landmark: the Charlie Brown Cafe. Dedicated to all things Peanuts, this coffee house provides stressed-out college kids the chance to escape into a simpler world.

Charlie-Brown-Snoopy-Coffee-Shop Busan Korea

Personally, I’ve never understood the appeal of Peanuts. The comic strips are uniformly unfunny and poorly drawn. Yes, I said it! Charles Schulz must be the among the most overrated cartoonists of all time. Charlie Brown looks just like Linus, who looks just like Sally, but with different hair. If you’ve read four or five of the comics, you understand everything there is to know about all the characters.

Also, I always found Franklin really awkward. I mean, each character has a single trait: Peppermint Patty is a tomboy, Linus is insecure, Lucy is a bully and Franklin… well, Franklin is black. And I don’t consider Charlie Brown a “lovable loser” at all. Watch him fall for Lucy’s football trick enough times, and you start to realize that there’s nothing lovable about him. He’s just a loser. Grow some balls, Charlie Brown. That should be the title of the next animated special.

But even I, a virulent Peanuts-hater, couldn’t help but be charmed by the Charlie Brown Cafe. My cappuccino was served with Snoopy-shaped cinnamon (don’t even get me started on the claim that Snoopy is a “beagle”!), matching the powdered sugar on the brownie. Everything… from the cups, plates and chairs are Peanuts-based; we sat at the Linus table, and fetched our coffee when our Peppermint Patty buzzer rang.

If you’re in the area of PNU and could benefit from a world of pure innocence, then definitely check out the Charlie Brown Cafe.

Location on our Busan Map
-Our Visit To The Puppy Café in Busan

The Peanuts in Korea
The Peanuts Coffee Shop
Snoopy Art
Huge-Charlie-Brown-Face
Charlie-Brown-Cafe
Charlie-Brown-Cafe-in-Busan
Lonely Snoopy
Snoopy-Browny
Charlie Brown Coffee Shop
Charlie Brown Coffee Mug
Charlie-Brown-Cafe
Charlie-Brown-3D
Lines Charlie Brown
Schroeder-in-Busan-Peanuts
Snoopy and Charlie Brown
The-Peanuts-Coffee-Mug
Woodstock-in-Korea

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June 25, 2012 at 3:22 am Comments (16)

The Hike to Songjeong Beach

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At the far northeastern end of Busan, Songjeong Beach is a more beautiful and far less popular stretch of sand than the city beaches of Haeundae or Gwangalli. Although you can get there with bus or taxi, the best way to arrive is over a gorgeous three-kilometer hike through the woods.

Busan Beaches

The hike begins near the Jangsan metro station and, like all walking trails in Korea, is well-marked and easy to follow. There’s some workout equipment along the way, but the real reason to tackle the hike is for the amazing views over the sea and the forest valley.

Halfway through, the peaceful silence we’d been enjoying was interrupted by an outlandishly loud alarm coming from somewhere down the coast. After it had sounded for a few minutes, a woman came on the loudspeaker, saying something in Korean. We waited hopefully for an English translation, but it never appeared. And then, the alarm again for at least five minutes. We were all alone in the woods, unable to judge the reactions of others. Were people in the city running in panic for the nearest bunker? Had North Korea pressed the big red button? Had the woman provided instructions on surviving the imminent nuclear holocaust?

Eventually, we saw a family hiking on the trail, at a calm, un-panicked pace. The Korean government tests the alarm system about once a month, bringing all traffic to a standstill, and this must have one such time.

Songjeong Beach awaited us at the end of our hike. Unlike the city beaches, there were no other foreigners here, just big groups of college-age kids playing organized games, and throwing girls into the water — with somewhat more brutality than we Westerners employ. We watched them for awhile, waving off their attempts to get us to join in, and walked to the end of the beach.

A small, wooded peninsula called Jukdo Park caps the beach, providing a shaded relaxation area and a pavilion for views which stretch out over the sea and back towards the beach. There’s less development here than at Busan’s other beaches, and the result is a much prettier panorama. So far, this is one of our favorite spots in the city, and definitely worth the effort of reaching. And if you’re not feeling up to the short hike, a taxi from Jangsan costs about $2.50.

Location of the Hike’s Start
-Bolivia Travel Blog

High-Tech-Hike
Hiking Korea
Urban Garden Korea
Korean Trolls
Geocaching-Korea
Mike Hike
Scary Ass Spider
Fucking Korea
Hoola Hoop Dude
Coastal-Hike-Busan
Busan Blog
Korean Sea
Korea Photos
Roof Top Work Out
Songjeong-Beach
Ghost Ship Korea
Girl-in-Trouble
Korean-Pants-Dropping
Korean Pain
Korean Water Bombs
Korean-Group-Hug
Korean Hipsters
Alone Forever
Korean Surfer
Surfing in Korea
Bitch Volley Balls
Korean Art
Songjeong-Busan
Modern Art Busan
Holy Rock Busan

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June 25, 2012 at 12:23 am Comments (0)

Jagalchi Fish Market

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The largest fish market in South Korea is found in downtown Busan, next to the busy shopping area of Nampo-dong and adjacent to the Lotte Aqua Mall. That it occupies such a valuable, central location speaks to how important the fish trade has always been to the city.

Cheap Fish

The market is massive and seems to go on forever. Thousands of stands with what must be billions of fish compete with each other for customers, and there’s no doubt who’s in charge: the hardened, crafty women known as the Jagalchi Ajumas. “Ajuma” means “married woman”, and these ladies conduct almost all the business at the market, whether that’s the business of beheading a fish, prying open a clam, or haggling with a customer. Most likely, they could do all of these things simultaneously.

We were amazed during our visit; the Jagalchi Market is like an aquarium, with every sort of fish imaginable and some species I’d never seen before. Among countless others, I saw colorful shrimp the size of trout, blowfish, shark, sea urchins, monkfish, mollusks, and the slightly off-putting penis fish.

Of course, the big difference between this and an aquarium is that these fish are waiting to die. To be ripped apart in the most horrific ways imaginable and then consumed. I saw a group of eels who had been skinned alive, still squiggling around in their pail. There’s enough material here to fuel a thousand gore flicks… just substitute “human” for “octopus”. That’s what was running through my head, as I watched a group of plucky octopuses working together to climb out of their bucket, only to be whacked in the head by their insidious Ajuma keeper. Soon, she would choose one to hack to pieces and then serve as a still-twitching meal. Hollywood, take note.

There are a few different sections of the Jagalchi market. We started in the outdoor zone, with a nice view over the port, and then moved into the Dry Fish area, where dried sardines, kelp and cod are sold in unbelievable volume. The centerpiece of the market, though, is the new Shindonga building, built in 2006. The exterior design features white winged shapes, creating the impression of giant seagulls descending onto the building. Inside are yet more stands and restaurants where you can eat sashimi; similar to the Millak sashimi hall we visited, but on a different scale.

We had a great time in Jagalchi — it’s one of the absolute highlights of Busan.

Location on our Busan Map
-Cheap Places To Stay in Busan

Photographer Busan
Shopping in Korea
Snail Cleaning
Korean Snail
Busan-Ajuma
Dry Fish Market Busan
Dry Me Some Fish
Waiting For Costumers
Good Posture
Fried Eel
Baked Fish
Jagalchi-Ajuma
Jagalchi
Jagalchi-Market
Korean Manta
Korean Squid
Life Fish
Oh Crab
OMG-Everything-So-cheap
Silver Fish
Skinned Fish
Dry-Silver-Fish
Lunch Time
Rusty Boats
Ship Blog
Korean Fisherboat
Night Fishing Korea
Korean LOL
Jagalchi-Snack
Harbor Dudes
Jagalchi-Nompo-Dong
Korean Bridge
Fish-Statue
View-From-Jagalchi-Market
Korean Fish Market
Fishy Hangout
Fish DAy
Humor Fish
Hook Up Korea
Huge Fishmarket
Very Cool Fish
Super Fresh Seafood Korea
Pretty Shell
Jagalchi-Restaurants
Working Hard in Korea
Snoozing Korea

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June 24, 2012 at 2:32 am Comments (3)

Soju Haiku

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Order Soju Online

Are more than one haiku called haiki? I don’t think so, but I’m too drunk on soju to really care. Imo, another bottle, please! And you might want a few, too, before reading my haiku. (Is more than one bottle of soju called soji?)

Evening of soju,
Puked on your boss and passed out.
It’s seven p.m.
If I drank as much
As that little old woman,
Hospital visit.
One hundred ten won?
But that’s less than a dollar…
You people are nuts!
Soju Busan

Soju is the most-sold liquor in the world, and it’s basically only consumed in Korea. Now, wrap your head around those two facts. Koreans drink more soju than everyone in the world drinks Johnnie Walker. That is insane. In 2004, more than three billion bottles were sold. Three billion.

Made from rice, soju tastes like vodka but sweeter. At about 20%, soju has a significantly lower alcohol content than the harder liquors, but the sheer amount that people drink makes up for that. Koreans drink soju everywhere; with dinner, chilling with friends, at the baseball game. We’ve seen hikers pull bottles out of their backpacks during breaks. And the price! You can get a small bottle for $0.99 at the supermarket. And though one is more than enough to intoxicate, it’s customary for a couple having dinner at a restaurant to put down three or more.

Drinking soju is a huge part of the culture here, and comes with its own set of rules. It’s nearly always consumed neat, in shot glasses which are sipped from. But should your drinking buddy issue the rallying cry “One-Shot”, you should pound it all at once. Empty glasses should be immediately refilled, and the younger, or lower-status person should always refill the glass of his superior, using two hands. If someone hands you an empty glass, it means he intends on pouring for you, and you hold your glass with two hands to receive.

We’ve been met with incredulity from some Koreans when we order soju — they find it hard to believe that we actually like the stuff. The truth is, we don’t. Not really. If I have the choice between a shot of whiskey and soju, I would always choose the former. But we’re cheap drunks, and 99 cents a bottle isn’t something we’re going to pass up.

-Busan Travel Book Coming Soon

Soju
Soju Drunk
Soju Glasses

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June 23, 2012 at 1:50 am Comments (5)

Get Your Puppy Fix in Jangsan

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Give Your Dog a Stylish Home – Get Up to 30% Off Dog Houses

It’s been five months since Jürgen and I lost our French Bulldog to cancer. We’ve been able to distract ourselves with travel, but every once in awhile (and especially after seeing a French Bulldog on the streets), I’ll feel that empty pang of sadness, and start wishing I had a dog again. Luckily, there’s a place in Busan where I can go to purge myself of such silly whims.

Puppy Cafe in Busan

Across the street from Exit 3 of the Jangsan Metro, there’s a pet store. On the bottom floor, it’s just your normal shop selling puppies and pet supplies. But upstairs, chaos reigns. This is the Puppy Cafe, where about twenty dogs of every species, age and size are running around, vying for human attention, wrestling with each other, pissing, barking and generally acting insane.

On entering the cafe, we were greeted by a deafening chorus of barks. “NEW HUMANS!” Of course, it was the biggest dogs who wanted to jump on us; a golden lab who needed to lick our faces (“I must!”) and a heavy black lab that almost knocked me down. Over the noise, the waiter (attendant? nanny?) asked us for the ₩8000 ($7.20) entry fee, then prepared a free coffee while we acquainted ourselves with the gang.

Let’s see, there was Stinky, Stanky, Stupid and Stonky. We sat down on chairs and pet whatever dog forced his way between our legs. The big ones were more successful in this, particularly the black lab who got to know my crotch on a rather intimate basis. One nasty little white dog in a coat decided to try adopting me, and sat at my feet shivering and snarling at anyone else who got too close. I didn’t really want to cuddle with her, but felt bad shooing away something so rotten and alone.

We moved into a separate area for the smallest dogs, and I found my favorite of the day: a snow-white Pekingese, so soft, cuddly and pliable. He had no problem with me picking him up, and immediately settled into a comfortable position on my lap. Jürgen welcomed a little pinscher onto his lap — two Korean girls who were there petting poodles told us that the pinscher was, and I quote, a “whore”.

The cafe was a blast; the dogs were cute, funny and friendly, and we had a great time playing with them, although we did stink like hell when we left. I’m surprised that more doggie stores don’t offer a place for people to sit and play with their dogs. Especially in a city like Busan, where apartments are small and schedules are hectic, dogs are a luxury that don’t fit into most people’s lives. A place like this, where you can come and get your puppy fix, seems like a no-brainer. And I’m sure the dogs love it.

Location on our Busan Map
-Please Like Us On Facebook

Stonken Cute
Korean Boss
Let-Me-Be-Your-Valentine
Dog Cafe Busan
Happy Dogs
Korean Husky
Let ME IN
Poodle Fuck
Rotten Dog
I want Treats
Doggy Pictures
Korean CAt

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June 20, 2012 at 9:37 am Comments (5)

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